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times writing about what he called immigration fear. country and stronger role of law, passed copperheads of reform. -- past comprehensive reform. then there is this summary from the new york times editorial. there is a better way to be safer. pass an immigration bill if terrorists, drug traffickers, and gang bangers with sharp meters in the immigrant haystack, then shrink the haystack. get 11 million people on the books, find out who they are. the issueur calls on of boy scouts of america we welcome jim to the conversation from oklahoma. good morning. the gay crowd wants to push how they live on uni. they should be able to decide their own rules and the government should be completely out of it. just like the gay marriage thing. if they want to get married, fine. if a certain church doesn't want to marry them, then so be it. the government should stay out of the whole issue. that's it. host: part of the debate this week on what to do with the alleged bomber involved in the killing of three bostonians over this past week. the headline, republicans want the boston bombing suspe
in boston as an scuse because our law toughens i think things up. >> the senate bill would have multiple background chengs and make sure anyone over-staying a visa would be detected. right now, there is no check on airport departures. as for those who came without visas, lindsay graham says this. >> now is the time to bring all the 11 million out of the shadows and find out who they are. most of them are here to work. but wree may find some terrorists in our midst who, have been hiding in the shadows, when it comes to the entry/exit. the 19 hijackers were all student who is overstayed their visas and the system didn't capture that. >> the senate holds the second two of hearings on immigration reform tomorrow. >> it will be very interesting. an emotional ballgame in beston last night, after a week of terror. >> shannon: a yesterday's home game was made more special by neil diamond, who made it there on the red-eye. members of law enforcement, first responders and marathon participants were also honored. david ortiz had a passionate rally cry. >> it doesn't say red sox, it says boston... w
exception under the miranda allowing law enforcement to interview him, making sure there are no other bombs, threats, perpetrators still out there giving the law enforcement flexibility to do the that prior to miranda and i think the court will interpret it broadly and give them the time they need to make sure that the public is safe. after that, he will have to be mirandized, doesn't mean the end of cooperation, but no basis yet to conclude they should be treated at enemy combatants. we're talking about an american citizen on american soil. there's no evidence that i've seen yet that they were a part of an al qaeda cell or directed by a foreign government. we're very far afield from a situation which is sort of the paradigm for enemy combatant status. that is, someone captured on the balg battlefield in a theater of war. resist these charges as an enemy combatant. the court has proven capable of supporting a terrorist constitution and i'm confident the justice department with all the evidence we've seen and a lot more we haven't can build a very strong case. >> congressman, at this point w
and run database checks and law enforcement intelligence indices, reach out to allies and let's say there wasn't much there, they he work with the fsb. >> used to be called the kgb. >> the rough equivalent of the fbi for russia. >> but we do admit one thing. we a game changer now. we to go after every bit of this information and track it down and be on top. the patriot law we got to start looking at people's computers, the internet. we got to start changing. >> geraldo: at least when you question a guy you put him on a list and when comes back from russia after is six months say hey, where have you been, man? we'll be right back. it doesn't matter where a good idea comes from, it only matters that it shows up and makes things better. in that spirit, verizon is proud to announce the powerful answers award. 10 million dollars in prizes for the beseas. s so big, they have the power to change everything. whether it's our inspiration, or yours, the world's biggest challenges deserve even bigger solutions. the powerful answers award from verizon. starts with ground beef, onions and pepper
law enforcement, of deep concern of ammunition, guns and working bombs these men had. they were so disciplined. >> any indication of another sleeper cell? >> right now, no evidence of a broader plot involving more people here, but law enforcement officials say they can't take that chance. the investigation is full tilt to find that out. >> okay, pierre, thanks very much. let's get more on this from our team of analysis from our team, dan abrams, brad garrett and richard clarke. dan, let me begin with you. the question about the questioning of the witness, at least at first he will not be read his miranda rights. >> that's right. you heard pierre talk about this public safety exception. basically the supreme court has recognized that, in some cases, if there's the possibility of an imminent threat that you can ask limited questions without further reading someone their miranda rights and that's what they're saying here, now, down the road, will someone challenge it and say this shouldn't have happened? sure. courts may have to resolve the specifics in this case later. but there is n
of the establishment. look at aljer hiss. he was a supreme court court. his brother was a law partner. how could he be a communist spy? yet, he was. terrorists can learn that lesson. the best way to avoid scrutiny is to look like you fit in. >> we just had anna chatman, remember her, the sexy russian spy who is moscow and putin gave her an award. you raise a point about letting him back into the country, not just the first time but last year when he came back from russia. has there been an unfortunate pattern of that? egypt didn't want theli sheikh. he's convicted of being the leader of the cell that went to attack the world trade center in 1993 and plot the bombing of landmarks. he's a notorious convicted international terrorist. where is the gap? where are the holes? have we made mistakes? >> i think there are a lot of holes in our immigration system. look. i speak as someone who favors more legal immigration, but i can tell you. when i was at the justice department in the 1980s, fbi agents came and told me there were 10,000 iranian graduate students in the country and they weren't studying engli
in cleveland working for a law firm, and this next call comes from bobby in ohio. >> caller: i've got a question for you in regards to the comment you made about rg 3:and the article about him being called an uncle tom. why would you state that person saying that would be republican? wouldn't democrats actually sometimes have feelings like that? i'm a republican, and i don't feel that way towards rg iii, so i'm just curious why you would say that. >> guest: you either misunderstood what i said, or i said it badly. what i said was the espn guy criticized rg iii because he thought he was republican. he said there's a rumor he's republican, i don't know about that. he's got a white fiancee, i don't know about that. he called him a cornball brother because he suspected that rg iii was a republican, but he had a white fiancee. that is why this caster called him a cornball brother which i think is a racist thing. so i'm sorry if i misexplained it. >> host: go ahead, bobby, you're still on the line. >> caller: i appreciate that. i agree the same way you do then. i think it's totally a racist
by will you -- must include the contributions of the transgendered? by law. you will have to have pages on transgendered contributions. people who were crossed over sex, or dressed in the other sex. clothing. isn't that absurd? isn't that totalitarian? i thought the purpose of the textbook was to tell the truth, not make groups feel good. but as i point out in the book, leftism is overwhelmingly rooted in feelings. >> host: dennis prager is the author. "still the best hope" is the name of his recent best seller. louis from florida, you're on the air. you're talking with dennis prager. >> caller: i'd like to ask mr. prayinger and his ilk what he just said about truth, why should people believe the bible when that's the biggest novel ever written? who believes the earth is 5,000 years old? how can you follow a book that tells you the world is 5,000 years old and hisclass commentary about the christian schools and the seminary, how does he say something like that and he wants to be honest? i know this man is a right winger, and he wouldn't fifth credit to anybody, but my main question is,
an ngo if it runs afoul of laws on foreign money. i think the main thing would be what does the organization itself want? the democracy and human rights activist in egypt was company on this a year or two back and said, ask of the organization. it's probably the best judge of its own risks and what it needs. so that's all i can suggest on that. >> i'm with the investigative project on terrorism to our organization tracks domestic islamists that are filled with the rugged such as the council -- islamic society of north america and we've been able to see if there's been a close correlation between these groups and lobbying the obama administration. it come out and support the brotherhood in egypt and elsewhere in the middle east. do you think that they are having an impact on how the administration deals with indigenous christians in the muslim world? >> quick canvass. we would have no idea on, you know, what are the dynamics, just observe the phenomenon, the current administration, with the bush administration as far as are doing with iraq did not raise this issue, did not fo
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9

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